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Saturday, August 28, 2010

Unveiling..............


Okay, this is it! Are you ready? It's my new business motto, and it's also a life motto, because it's absolutely true, not advertising hype. Here it is:

I don't believe in books because I sell them; I sell books because I believe in them.

11 comments:

Dawn said...

Perfect!

torchlakeviews said...

Everything I've been doing lately leads me to the same two-part conclusion. It is important to digitize source materials so that they can be easily shared--and it is important to make real books of the images and stories that we love, against the day when the servers die or the "clutter" is cleaned up and pitched into the dustbin of history or the technology changes and the files become unreadable. I believe in books and Kindles, in bookshelves and Archive.org. And of course, I believe in booksellers, because they are reliable guides to riches.

P. J. Grath said...

Thank you, Dawn and Gerry, my loyal supporters!

upwoods said...

Excellent slogan! Your love of books shows through. I think the best sellers of books are those that truly deeply love them. And you are one.

P. J. Grath said...

Thank you, Kathy. This is also my explanation for the old books on agriculture and philosophy in my bookstore. It isn't that there's a constant demand for such things but that they are among the books I love, so people know I will have them.

flandrumhill said...

C.S. Lewis said that we read to know that we are not alone. Every book has the potential to deeply connect us with another. That's why I believe in books too. Excellent motto.

flandrumhill said...

I just finished reading The Bookseller of Kabul. My son Kip loaned me his copy. He tried to find his bookshop while in Kabul but didn't have any luck. Have you read it yet Pamela?

P. J. Grath said...

Amy-Lynn, you and I have much in common. I did read THE BOOKSELLER OF KABUL, back in 2009, and went back today to read the post I wrote after finishing the book to refresh my memory. Here is the link if you are interested:

http://booksinnorthport.blogspot.com/2009/02/lengthy-miscellany.html

Perhaps in the context of my new motto you were thinking more about the bookseller than his children, but for me the younger generation was in deepest conflict. I won’t repeat here all I wrote a year and a half ago; it’s still there for anyone who wants to go back and read it. I’ll simply say I wish the bookseller had offered the “power of books” more generously to his daughter. I wonder what her life is like today.

flandrumhill said...

Yes I was thinking of the bookseller. He was so passionate about books and it was such a shame that his sons weren't similarly inclined.

It seemed like some of the women in his family would have been better suited for working with him at his business.

Thank you for the link. I'll check out your review.

P. J. Grath said...

The wisest of fathers can see when their daughters are the ones to follow in their footsteps. In this case, I wonder what happened.

I didn't really review, Amy-Lynn. Just followed my own thoughts and let my wondering follow a side road, contrasting the bookseller's daughter, Leila, with an American woman's struggle against odds to become a doctor.

Hope. Is that the difference? What keeps hope alive in some cultures, in some souls, when it flickers and goes out in others?

flandrumhill said...

Yes, I think hope is key. At its most basic level, it gives people a reason to have a smile on their face when they get out of bed in the morning. That's bound to get the day off to a good start, not just for one person, but for everyone they encounter throughout the day.

I greatly enjoyed reading your thoughts on the book. Sharing certainly does enhance the reading experience.