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Sunday, October 4, 2009

Day of Few Words


We went to a chili party last night near the Bight. (Do you know what a bight is? It's a bay on a bay.) I took a salad made from Sweeter Song vegetables and our own delicious tomatoes, plus dried cranberries (we're temporarily--very temporarily, that will be--out of cherries) and veggie crisps, my latest snack addiction. It was a lovely evening in an old cottage from the American Craftsman era (this particular house from 1913), indoors by the fires with friends, not bothered at all by the autumn rain. Later, arriving home, as we pulled up in front of our old farmhouse the clouds parted to reveal the full moon. The moon is really my whole story for today (the rest is commentary), but another couple of images begged to be included, so here they are.

The first is Sarah last week in the upper reaches of the Mississippi River. Doesn't she look completely "in her element"? She does not, however, like to go in deeper than she can touch bottom.



The second is another image of An American Bible for one of several readers going by the name "Anonymous."

8 comments:

Gerry said...

What a wonderful way to spend an autumn evening, and what a fine moon you have there.

flandrumhill said...

Lovely moon image you've captured. I've yet been able to take a decent photograph of one.

I did not know that a bight was a bay on a bay. I wonder if Cow Bay has a bight...

The lettering in An American Bible is so beautiful.

Jessica Winder said...

That photograph of the moon is fantastic!

Anonymous said...

The moon is gorgeous, but the American Bible is gorgeouser. I mean, as Ronald Reagan might have said, when you've seen one full moon you've seen them all.

P. J. Grath said...

I must confess to all of you that I have been trying and failing, over and over, to get a decent shot of the moon. Most of the time I simply cannot get the focus right. Very frustrating! So thank you for sharing my pleasure in this small success.

There was a connection I didn't make between the cottage we visited and the Roycroft book. Both are examples of the American arts and crafts movement. I really should do a post sometime on that unique American style. Finding examples in the Orsay Museum in Paris gave me a serious thrill of national pride.

P. J. Grath said...

P.S. Jessica, a lot of bays probably have bights that are simply called bays. "The Bight" north of Northport is the only one I know that carries the name, and it doesn't have a proper name, only the common appellation, capitalized.

Anonymous said...

Our house is Arts & Crafts, too, P, and a lot of our furniture, pottery, etc. Come visit again!

P. J. Grath said...

http://char.txa.cornell.edu/art/decart/artcraft/artcraft.htm is a nice site for seeing the relationship of Arts and Crafts in England vs. U.S., American Mission style, and European Art Nouveau. Yes, of course, your house is that style, Susan! I find the architecture very comfortable and gracious and inviting, as are you and Larry!